Chris Hanson String Theory Exhibition September 15th-October 31st

Chris Hanson String Theory Exhibition September 15th-October 31st

Chris Hanson studied art in London and was influenced by the work of Jackson Pollock, Gerhard Richter, Sam Francis, and Mark Rothko. In his work, he experiments with expressionism and abstraction and prefers to express his emotions rather than illustrating them. He tries to capture the artistic moment with an active painting style, moving around the canvas.
 
The paintings are developed from an accumulation of intuitive and spontaneous reactive gestures of applying paint. The paintings come into existence by a combination of unpredictable occasions of pure chance, and the influence of outside sources. When making abstract work, belief and commitment are essential to the development and maturity in a painting with lasting character.
 
A common theme is the element of chance and lack of suggestion of specific content, as the painting reveals itself to both the painter and the viewer differently, giving the images a life of their own. Many of the paintings are created by adding pools, drips, and splatters of color to previous layers of paint that allows for an intimate complexity. The use of space in loose configurations facilitates the balance of color.

 

Randolph Johnson  California Dreamin'

Randolph Johnson California Dreamin'

Born and raised in South Beach, Florida, Randolph has lived and studied in Paris and New York, finding motivation for his work in his immediate surroundings. His paintings and murals have contributed to the collections of a global clientele and have been represented in museums and galleries throughout the U.S. 

Randolph paints landscapes, seascapes, portraits and still life works of art inspired by the beauty and diversity of Sonoma County, where he resides and maintains a studio on his family ranch.  The California Dreamin' series highlights the world class California Wine Country with it's exceptional vistas and the notion of a quieter lifestyle where time seems to slow down and the hustle of the big city is left behind. Johnson's work makes you stop and think about an existance where vineyards, ranches and farms meld together in a perfect setting creating a lifestyle envied by many.

 

Hanson Gallery Welcomes Christopher Owen Nelson

Hanson Gallery Welcomes Christopher Owen Nelson

Connecting with Nature

Christopher Owen Nelson thrives in the vast arid landscape of the American West. As a Colorado native, he studied fine arts at Rocky Mountain College of Art and Design where he learned classical methods in drawing and painting. While developing a deep appreciation for composition and form, Nelson focused on employing alternative materials; sculpting with used carpet, found objects and painting on glass. He continued on to pursue a career in construction, whereby gaining valuable knowledge in concrete, steel and woodworking that would eventually lay substructure for a new and innovative artistic approach. Electric power tools became primary instruments, with paints and textiles applied at later stages in conceptual evolution. 

 

Nelson’s creativity is fathomless, as is evident in all aspects of his life. As a successful songwriter/musician, he conveys feelings of beauty and loss, lightness and dark intertwine. These same concepts are mirrored in his visual art, where barren, leafless trees fracture solitary space. Nelson’s portraiture suggests that even the people we are the most intimate with will forever remain mysterious beings. Here, beauty is drawn from the darker aspects of life. There is a consistent thread that runs throughout all bodies of his work; a need to transform shadow and grit into something beautiful and smooth. 

 

Critical attention and art world accolades have been swift and abundant. Early honors include the Most Promising Artist Scholarship Award, and being named as one of “21 Under 31 Emerging Artists” earmarked for success, by Southwest Art Magazine. Recently Nelson’s achievements in the arts have been featured in several national publications, including: Western Art Collector; Luxe Interiors and Design; Western Art and Architecture; Santa Fean magazine, and American Art Collector. 

Original Work by Robert Bissell

Original Work by Robert Bissell

A show including original works of the artist Robert Bissell will be on display at Hanson Gallery 669 Bridgeway Sausalito CA and will continue through December 31st, 2016.

Inspired in his childhood of animals in their natural settings gave the artist a special perspective on nature.

While out in the field sketching, a tiny field mouse scampered into view.  On a lark he decided to include the field mouse in his landscape which, to viewers, became the engaging element in the work.  From there Bissell realized he could suggest narratives to people through painting animals.  “The paintings are really about the human condition, says Bissell, the animals are the protagonists in my narratives.  I don’t try to emphasize human qualities in the animals, I try to get people to see animal qualities in themselves."

His coffee table book “Hero: The paintings of Robert Bissell is inspired by Joseph Campbell’s The Hero with a Thousand Faces.  

In Bissells hand those on the heroic journey are all sorts of wildlife but mostly bears and rabbits.  Like all on a quest or following a calling, they often face challenges and obstacles-physically as well as ones that call into question lifes bigger questions.

Despite a calm whimsical world there is often a bit of edge to Bissells somewhat peaceable kingdom.  There can be a menace there.  I find life is like that.  I am never sure what people are thinking.

While he doesn’t see himself as an environmental activist, it is part of a message he hopes to communicate. Bissells work disarms by narrating vitally grown-up and urgent allegories in the guise of childlike humor observed the late New York Times art critic William Zimmer.  "Like a latter day Beatrix Potter, in whose illustrations everything is seen from a rabbit’s eye view, a good deal of Bissell’s content suggests menace, and mirrors human existence.  Bissell’s creatures great and small easily become our surrogates, and the paintings may be read as life lessons."

 

 

New Work by Eon Burchman

New Work by Eon Burchman

Hanson Gallery welcomes the work of Robert Bissell

Hanson Gallery welcomes the work of Robert Bissell

New Work by Jaline Pol

New Work by Jaline Pol

Southwest Art July 2015

Southwest Art July 2015

Gail Morris Essence of the Land

On a spring day in Sausalito, CA, Gail Morris is hard at work in her studio overlooking the San Francisco Bay. A hazy blue sky peeks through windows that stretch along the north and west sides of the warehouse space. A stunning view of Mount Tamalpais greets visitors, and in the middle of the 800-square-foot studio sit two easels. On one rests a landscape inspired by rural Sonoma County, featuring a stream slicing through lush grassy fields. A thin strip of low-hanging fog hovers close to the ground. The second easel showcases a large-scale, more abstract scene that evokes a strong, harsh southwestern light on walls and buildings. She refers to the painting as one of her “deconstructed works with man-made underpinnings.” 
The paintings represent the two differing styles in Morris’ current body of work, which has evolved organically over the years. When Morris first started painting seriously in 1996, her inspiration sprung mainly from the early California Impressionists and their portrayals of atmosphere and light. Back then, Morris’ paintings tended to be tighter and more realistic in the vein of William Wendt and his contemporaries.
But gradually, using bigger brushes and creating countless quick plein-air sketches, Morris says her style shifted into something looser and more contemporary. Today her works straddle the line between realism and abstraction. A quintessential Morris painting evokes the mountains, fog, fields, skies, and seas of Northern California in a spare minimalism often punctuated with layers of vibrant color. Christi Bonner Manuelito, a partner at Bonner David Galleries, which has represented Morris since 2004, says, “Gail has a unique linear view of nature and combines it with an emotional expression of color. She captures the essence of the land, removing details that are not important to her eye.”

The painting QUIET AFTERNOON represents what Morris terms her more traditional work these days. A stream meanders through a field toward a vanishing point in the distance, complemented by layers of a pale-to-navy-blue sky. AROUND AND DOWN as well as ST. LUCIA WATERLINE [see page 84] are what Morris calls prime examples of her “deconstructed” landscapes—each featuring many shades of the same color and a great deal of distressing to create the final image. Morris distresses canvases with sandpaper, steel wool, X-Acto knives, and rags, leaving faint impressions or “underpinnings” behind. Describing both her more traditional as well as her deconstructed works, Morris says, “I see the sky as an element that pushes down on the earth. So rather than going back to a vanishing point, I see the landscape as elements stacked one on top of the other.”
Indeed, Morris’ early interest in California Impressionism has been replaced by styles more reminiscent of the color-field painters and abstract expressionists like Mark Rothko. The flat-planed perspective of artists like Rothko and, closer to home, Californian Richard Diebenkorn, are among her important influences today. Morris says half-jokingly that her attraction to flattened perspective may stem from being farsighted in one eye and nearsighted in the other. “The flat perspective has always interested me because of my vision; it’s the way I see things,” she says.
When creating new works, Morris is fond of alternating between the traditional and the more abstract. Hence the two easels. For example, if she has been painting larger abstract pieces, she “reels” herself back in and journeys to nearby locales to do pastel sketches. “Wolf Kahn referred to it as keeping yourself from going into never-never land,” Morris says. “You always need to go back outside to the source of your inspiration if you are a landscape painter.”
While Morris is often inspired by the California terrain, as well as scenes from northern New Mexico and Hawaii, she has traveled widely to far-flung destinations around the world. She brings a treasure trove of memories and photo references of global landscapes to her artistic table. She grew up in a string of cities across the Midwest, including Chicago, Detroit, Milwaukee, and St. Louis, attending six schools by the time she was in seventh grade. When it came time for college she studied painting at first, but a professor told her she wasn’t going to make it as an artist. Become a teacher, he advised. So Morris shifted to art history as a major while at Webster University in Missouri, and to satisfy her creative nature, she took up photography. Through a boyfriend who was a tour manager, she was eventually hired as the official photographer for the Joe Cocker Band. Soon she was leading the vagabond life, traveling abroad to cities such as London and Amsterdam.
The photography gig lasted three years, but finally, growing weary of life on the road, she settled down in Amsterdam. While there, Morris managed an ethnographic art gallery and continued to sell her photographs to magazines and newspapers. In the late 1970s, she returned to the United States with thousands of slides and negatives in tow. One day soon after her return, she deposited a 35-pound suitcase full of slides on the desk of an editor at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Impressed by her work, which included 3,000 images of the Dogon people of Mali in West Africa, the editor took Morris under his wing and began publishing her human-interest stories in the paper.
A move to San Francisco in 1980 marked a period of major transitions and milestones in both her personal and professional life. Once ensconced in the City by the Bay, Morris began working in the film industry as an executive producer and met her future husband on a film shoot. After the birth of her two daughters, she decided to work part-time as a location scout for movies and television commercials. The work catapulted her across the country to scenic back roads in search of the best places to shoot car and truck commercials. “I took hundreds of photos of these locations and also stockpiled them in my brain,” Morris says. “This is when I developed a real appreciation for the western landscape.”
In 1995 and 1996, she lost her best friend and her father, both of whom were artists, signaling yet another artistic turning point. Morris had not painted since her college days, but she suddenly felt the need to as part of her healing journey. For the next several years she took workshops with both Michael Workman and Wolf Kahn. There was never any doubt that her subject matter would be the landscape. “I like nature untouched by man,” Morris says. “I rarely put anything man-made into my landscapes—the exception being a little wooden fence or perhaps a dirt road on occasion. I do, however, have a fondness for barns.”
She sold her first painting in 1997 and 10 more to a San Francisco law firm that same year. Two years later she was garnering attention and acceptance into a number of regional and national shows and winning top prizes.
In the opening lines of the 2003 book Horizon Lines: The Paintings of Gail Morris, her former teacher Wolf Kahn wrote, “The landscape paintings of Gail Morris are spare and elegant. Economical divisions set off the near from the far spaces. Color relations are abstract and resonant. These pictures are evidence of a sensuous and celebratory response to nature and to life in general.”

Although her style has changed somewhat since the publication of the book, the quote could easily apply to her work today. Her canvases are color-saturated, featuring multiple layers of thin, diluted oil paint, and she is dedicated to subtracting any element that is “fussy,” all in pursuit of keeping a work “spare and elegant.” Throughout her painting career she has celebrated nature and elements such as water. Wherever she goes she seeks out vistas with streams, creeks, wetlands, rivers, and oceans to sketch or photograph as reference material. These days Morris, an avid swimmer and scuba diver, is intrigued with capturing the many stunning shades of water, such as the aqua in the shallow waters of Hawaii’s Big Island and the pinks, purples, and grays at sunrise and sunset.
No matter what style describes her work, it suggests a sense of place while evoking an emotional response. Interestingly enough, although Morris’ canvases are vibrant, viewers also find them “calming,” says Manuelito. They seem to get lost in time and submerged in the color harmonies and compositions. That suits Morris just fine—as long as calming doesn’t mean boring, that is. “I love landscape and what I paint, so if someone stands and stares at a painting, or if someone wants to buy a painting because they are able to look at it over and over again and see something a bit different each time, then I feel like I have communicated what I feel and love, through my art,” she says

Art in America June/July 2015

Art in America June/July 2015

Craig Marshall Smith

Southwest Art July 2015

Southwest Art July 2015

Giuseppe Palumbo featured

Hanson Gallery Fine Art presents the sculpture of Steven Michael Beck

Hanson Gallery Fine Art presents the sculpture of Steven Michael Beck

Steve Michael Beck is an award winning commercial Director. He directed commercials for First Union, GMC and Chevrolet, McDonalds and Gatorade. He has spend several years working for ILM as an Visual Effects Art Director on Films like "Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade", "The Abyss" and "The Hunt for Red October".

In his words, “I’ve spent the last 30 years pursuing the art of storytelling through advertising, film and television.  Specializing in visual effects oriented processes(and their often unique narratives), my direction constantly reflected my infatuation with animation the notion that any object or idea either contained “life”, or could be conjured into such (needless to say I had an imaginative childhood).  These projects and life lessons were all but stepping stones, leading me to see the potential of a new type of storytelling through combinations of sculpture, photography, text, and found object.

Guiseppe Palumbo's whimsical sculpture comes to Hanson Gallery Fine Art

Guiseppe Palumbo's whimsical sculpture comes to Hanson Gallery Fine Art

In the eyes of Giuseppe Palumbo
 “Giving breath to a fistful of clay or pulse to a crucible of molten metal defines art for me. I strive to add the intangible that words inadequately describe soul."


Sculpting is the natural progression of decades of designing and building architectural projects. The components that make each successful remain constant: concept, proportion, aesthetic, execution. 
To arrive at these, the natural world is a source of inspiration and knowledge of proportion.
With a foundation in classical objective training my interest is not to replicate an object or being but to create a spirit or archetype felt as well as seen. I am curious by the unheard voice beyond the academic, believing that true knowledge is a subjective process from within.

Hanson Gallery Welcomes the work of Spanish Artist Evaristo Alguacil

Hanson Gallery Welcomes the work of Spanish Artist Evaristo Alguacil

Spanish Artist Evaristo Alguacil is known for feeling, movement and light in his pieces.

He has taken the same feeling and has applied it to new works from his visit to San Francisco,

a place Evaristo has a great affinity for. 

Craig Marshall Smith Exhibition at Denver International Airport

Craig Marshall Smith Exhibition at Denver International Airport

The exhibition is dedicated to Smith’s father, Harry E. Smith, a World War II pilot who flew 30 missions in "Smoky Liz II," a B-17, with the 452nd Bombardment Group.

Hanson Gallery Fine Art welcomes Healdsburg artist Randolph Johnson

Hanson Gallery Fine Art welcomes Healdsburg artist Randolph Johnson

September 16, 2014

"My paintings reflect the poetry that I see in the moment when light falls on a subject and creates a profound depth of color and mood." Born and raised in South Beach, Florida, Randolph has lived and studied in Paris and New York, finding motivation for his work in his immediate surroundings. His paintings and murals have contributed to the collections of a global clientele and have been represented in museums and galleries throughout the U.S. Randolph paints landscapes, seascapes, portraits and still life works of art inspired by the beauty and diversity of Sonoma County, where he resides and maintains a studio on his family ranch.

Thomas Easley The Harvest Season

Thomas Easley The Harvest Season

September 10, 2014

During the fall when Sonoma, Napa and the wine growing regions of the United States turn their attention toward the harvesting of grapes, Thomas Easley has focused his passion on creating wine still life paintings that are reminiscent of the warmly lit rich style of European masters filled with attitude and elegance. It is in his wine paintings where the color and texture in the background builds upon the romance and emotion of the subject. The senses are encouraged to drink the wine and taste the fruit. His painting style with the wine pieces encompasses impressionism, realism, abstract, miniaturist detail and often surrealism to create an image all his own.

Michelle Tholen Landscapes

Michelle Tholen Landscapes

July 15, 2014

Tholen's inspiration is drawn from the landscapes in Northern California. The sustenance of stunning mist laden rivers, lakes, and waterways infused with atmosphere and sense of tranquility. Searching for what she loves and trying to capture its essence by showing how interesting that moment. In pursuit of the abstract, the timeless and transcendently rational, the work speaks to the cultural complexity. Hopeful in feeling, they suggest real and imagined, material and ethereal, familiar and foreign places.

Sheila Finch at Hanson Gallery Fine Art

Sheila Finch at Hanson Gallery Fine Art

July 1, 2014

Ask Sheila Finch if she is an artist, and she replies “Yes, that is who I am.” Not 'what', but 'who’. The deep truth of this statement has been borne out over and over as she has become the latest source of delightful works for private and corporate art collectors around the globe. Landscapes on the verge of abstracts reveal both her passion and her genius for color, for creating not just a scene, but the mood it engenders, as well.

GR Martin's work exhibited at Hanson Gallery

GR Martin's work exhibited at Hanson Gallery

Classical Realism combined with off-beat composition of familiar landscapes

September 23, 2013

Asked about the concepts behind his paintings he explains: “It’s the subtle shifts in perspective that I am drawn to. I love ambiguity in a painting and am genuinely interested in the different interpretations each person has. I think the singular influence in my work is TS Eliot. When I search for imagery and meaning as I paint my mind often goes to Four Quartets.”

Michael Parkes Sculpture comes to Hanson Gallery Fine Art

Michael Parkes Sculpture comes to Hanson Gallery Fine Art

Sculpture in the technique of the Renaissance Era

September 6, 2013

Hanson Gallery is proud to announce representation of the
master artist and sculptor Michael Parkes. Michael has had one-man exhibitions at the Basel Art Fair in Switzerland, Art Chicago, New York Art Expo, Frankfurt Book Fair, Amsterdam Art Fair, Tefaf Art and Antiques Fair Maastricht and is represented by prestigious galleries in Amsterdam, Paris, Denmark, Italy, New York, Los Angeles, Hanson Gallery Fine Art in the San Francisco Bay Area, and around the United States. In 2007, Michael was the guest of honor and featured artist in the international show “Venus and the Female Intuition,” exhibited in Denmark and Holland .

In 2007, Michael Parkes’ work inspired a contemporary ballet production by Scorpius Dance Theater of Phoenix, where his art came alive in the ballet’s sets and characters.

Carnegie Foundation acquires Hanson Gallery Fine Art artist Sheila Finch's work

Carnegie Foundation acquires Hanson Gallery Fine Art artist Sheila Finch's work

July 25, 2013

"Sheila paints from and is inspired by the Bay Area, but her paintings have universal appeal. There is passion and emotion in her landscapes and scenes of the sea. He compelling use of color and sweeping brush strokes draw you in and it is impossible to take this art for granted."

Gay Clyborn, Associate Vice President of the Carnegie Foundation at Stanford

Hines awarded Honorable Mention at Marin MOCA Museum of Contemporary Art in Marin County CA

Hines awarded Honorable Mention at Marin MOCA Museum of Contemporary Art in Marin County CA

July 20, 2013

Hines received an Honorable Mention at the MarinMOCA Museum of Contemporary Art Member Summer Exhibition "Out of Order."

Thomas Easley creates unique pieces for Hanson Gallery Fine Art in celebration of the America's Cup

Thomas Easley creates unique pieces for Hanson Gallery Fine Art in celebration of the America's Cup

Using his signature style, Thomas Easley has created beautiful new work.

June 1, 2013

Thomas Easley’s works are recognized by a signature style. Using layered and modeled acrylic paint on board, a rich vibrant image is created, They are bold and life affirming.

Thomas has created unique pieces for us in celebration of the Americas Cup.

Gail Morris New Work

Gail Morris New Work

April 1, 2013

"Color and light form the very core of the art of painting. Gail Morris takes these principles to unexpected places. Her paintings can be both precise and expressive and her control of the medium is astonishing. Snapshots of dawn, dusk or radiant sunlight etch themselves into our souls. They nest there and become memories-unlived but permanent and personal."
—GUILLERMO DEL TORO, WRITER/DIRECTOR OF THE OSCAR-WINNING FILM, "PAN’S LABYRINTH"

Eon Burchman New Work

Eon Burchman New Work

March 15, 2013

Marco DeNieri's new California landscapes

Marco DeNieri's new California landscapes

February 15, 2013

Hines New Work

Hines New Work

January 31, 2013

Gail Morris New work

Gail Morris New work

December 15, 2012

Jaline Pol New Work

Jaline Pol New Work

November 21, 2012

Carolyn Reynolds New Work

Carolyn Reynolds New Work

July 15, 2012

Hanson Gallery welcomes Jean Wells

Hanson Gallery welcomes Jean Wells

June 1, 2012

JalinePol New Work

JalinePol New Work

May 1, 2012

Marco De Nieri New Work

Marco De Nieri New Work

April 1, 2012

Eon Burchman New Work

Eon Burchman New Work

March 1, 2012

Scott Hanson completes newest commission

Scott Hanson completes newest commission

February 1, 2012

Damon Hyldreth completes newest commission

Damon Hyldreth completes newest commission

January 10, 2012

Damon Hyldreth has completed his newest commission for a
Newport California building.

Gail Morris New Work

Gail Morris New Work

November 1, 2011

Eon Burchman New Work

Eon Burchman New Work

October 1, 2011

Archie Held wins commission for PAC-12 Design

Archie Held wins commission for PAC-12 Design

August 16, 2011

Carolyn Reynolds comes to Hanson Gallery

Carolyn Reynolds comes to Hanson Gallery

July 1, 2011

Ramon Pujol joins Hanson Gallery

Ramon Pujol joins Hanson Gallery

June 3, 2011

Adair Payne completes latest commission

Adair Payne completes latest commission

April 20, 2011

Adair just completed his most recent commission
titled "The Dance of Autumn"
Measuring 60" x 48", the piece is one of the largest
commissions since his Lincoln Hills series.

Italian Artist Marco Di Nieri brings his Landscapes to Hanson Gallery

Italian Artist Marco Di Nieri brings his Landscapes to Hanson Gallery

March 10, 2011

The hyperrealistic style of Marco Di Nieri with
his landscapes evokes a sense of super reality.
With his perfectly patterned brushstrokes he
pays homage to Japanese woodblock printing.

Alfredo Navarro's newest Ocean Scenes arrive

Alfredo Navarro's newest Ocean Scenes arrive

February 15, 2011

Newest Abstract Landscape by Frank Davi

Newest Abstract Landscape by Frank Davi

January 20, 2011

Hanson Gallery is excited to debut Frank's newest painting for 2011.
Frank brings his signature style of multi-layered organic shapes and patterns
and with the addition of an evolved color palette and iconography combined with
a beautiful satin varnished surface.

Archie Held joins Hanson Gallery

Archie Held joins Hanson Gallery

December 1, 2010

Internationally recognized Bay Area artist Archie Held is now showing his work at Hanson Gallery.
Archie's work is included in many public and private art collections. He works primarily in bronze
and stainless steel, and water is often used as a central element to further compliment his designs.

Hanson Gallery opens winter show in Kenefick Ranch Wine Tasting Calistoga

Hanson Gallery opens winter show in Kenefick Ranch Wine Tasting Calistoga

October 14, 2010

HANSON GALLERY FINE ART has opened in the new Kenefick wine tasting room
at 1371 Lincoln Avenue Calistoga, CA 94515-1805. Please stop by to see the art
and enjoy a glass of wine while you are there.